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about opportunities in the areas of trade and energy and other global affairs that really should be taken advantage of by the united states moving forward. but we have to -- we emphasize as well there are three issues that were on an old agenda that had not been resolved and stood in the way of more productive relationship between the u.s. and latin america. these issues were drugs, cuba, and immigration. the first two issues were important at the summit of the americas. the report was released right before the summit of the americas. the first two issues were raised at the summit. the presidents get a mandate to the american states to study the drug issue and the president made it clear there would not be another summit or unlikely another summit unless there was cuban participation in the summit. those issues certain were prominent. i think the election results had interesting implications for all three of these. perhaps the most important is the last one, immigration, which was not on the summit agenda. i think it has raised some expectations that this may be a real opportunit
would add is the america's energy futures. that is a whole different presentation. i have to get back to work. i am sure you do, too. we set out to revitalize the alliance's. we decided to engage more deeply to advance our interests. as a result, these determinations, the president ended the war in iraq. he has started a path for transition in afghanistan. and doing so, the president has dramatically improved america poses strategic freedom of maneuver so that our posture alliances -- by renewing our leadership and ensure our focus matches our priorities and resources, and a laser light focus. for the geographic part of this, the president made a decision on the outlook to increase our focus on the asian pacific in terms of resources, diplomatic efforts, engagement, both with nations and regional institutions, and in terms of policy. secateurs clinton became the first secretary of state to make her inaugural trip to asia. the first foreign leader the president met with in the oval office was the prime minister of japan. these were early and important signals of the priorities that the
it is they were going to do anyway. >> i think we can have one last question. >> jim gingrich, energy research. to respond on gems comment on american policy. the review of the effective drug strategy, and does this represent an increasing militarization of american foreign policy? >> that's a very good question. question is to turn approach in yemen and elsewhere a reflection of u.s. foreign policy -- is greater militarization. >> yeah, that is a very, very big question. with regards to yemen, i definitely think you are onto something and i think there's a couple of reasons out what to very briefly and in closing. one is that drones, you know, there's a sense that using drone strikes, using airstrikes as a way that the affect the really combat its enemies without putting american forces at risk and with a sort of suffering the casualties we've seen in iraq and afghanistan. and while i think that maybe true long-term come i have great concerns about the potential blowback from his actions and that the potential casualties will be later on. that's a very difficult argument to make. i don't thin
tax reform. we could have energy legislation. we haven't even had a defense bill or appropriations bill or cybersecurity. joe lieberman is still trying to get the cybersecurity bill which is really important for this country. really dangerous. but the president, he is our leader. he needs to engage more. we got somebody here in the room that can talk to him. i'm incurable optimist. i think he may do it. >> well, i think it's got to start in this lame-duck session that begins tomorrow. we can't adopt a total bipartisan balanceed budget agreement but we can get -- balanced budget agreement but we can get started. we can have a down payment at least to cover the first year of what otherwise would be the sequester which is $110 billion, and i think we got to prove we can do some tax reform and we can do some entitlement reform and pull it together. and then adopt a process that tries again to push the committees -- according to the regular order -- to come out with enough savings and spending, enough new revenue as part of tax reform and most critically long-term entitlement reform. t
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4